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Author Topic: Switch rods  (Read 4076 times)

jbooyah

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Switch rods
« on: August 10, 2013, 11:33:56 AM »
I was wondering if anyone here uses a switch rod and what they think of them. I've only started fly fishing 4 seasons on a 7wt single handed rod and its been a blast but after an entire days worth of slinging line my shoulders and arms get real sore. I figured a two handed rig would help out with the soreness. Thnx
« Last Edit: August 10, 2013, 11:37:56 AM by jbooyah »

Nick

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2013, 10:00:08 AM »
I have couple switch rods that seem to get more use than my single handers these days.  A 7wt 11' St Croix Imperial and a 5wt 10' 6" Echo SR.  The 5wt casts real nice overhand as well as spey, but it all depends heavily on the line as well. Switch rods are a tough way to learn if you haven't spey casted before as they aren't as forgiving as a longer 12'6"+ rod.  But if you're doing it right that shoulder and arm soreness should be nonexistent.

Do you fish the river mostly?
-Nick

jbooyah

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2013, 01:40:57 PM »
Yes mostly river fishing. I was in Ireland earlier in the year and I talked to some folks who were spey casting and they let me had a go. My timing was way off on the anchor for the single spey and almost got a cheek piercing. Oddly enough when I did a double spey and I thought it was way easier. There's some HUGE pike over there. The flies they used to target them were just massive. I forget the brand of rod but it was an 8wt 13'6''. The allure for me from a two handed rig is the fact that you don't need too much space behind your back and the fact that both hands are involved so I would think it's not as fatiguing.

Nick

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2013, 07:45:51 PM »
For fishing the river they are a great tool. You're definitely right about needing less backcast room, and about casting being less fatiguing.
I'd suggest checking out the Confluence Fly Shop down by the harbor and talking with Ed or Scott. They specialize in spey/switch and do casting clinics and whatnot pretty regularly. Would be a great way to cast a few different rods before buying one.
-Nick

AP

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2013, 09:32:01 AM »
Another vote for Confluence.  They'll set you up right.  Spey and/or switch rods seem extremely sensitive to NEEDING the correct line(s) to cast well.  A "great" rod will cast like crap with the wrong line.  Many of the less expensive rods cast very well when paired with the right line.  The is where experienced people can save you a lot of time and effort.

Others might disagree but I'd seriously think about going to a straight spey rod rather than a switch rod, particularly if you are mainly thinking about steelhead fishing. 

jbooyah

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2013, 03:06:34 PM »
Silly me...I never even thought about doing the casting clinics. Thanks Nick.

As far as going to a straight spey setup...I just thought it would be too heavy of a rig for trout. I just thought a switch rod would be perfect for salmon and trout. But as Nick said I should go try them all out before I decide. Thanks again!  ;D

aaronk

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2013, 09:18:22 PM »
If I had to do it over again I'd buy a spey rod right out the gate.  The appeal of the switch rod initially caught my eye, but after using one for a year, I never casted it single handed but I did really push it's limits, treating it more as a full on spey rod casting big flies for steelhead last winter.

I know guys fish the salt with two handed rods, but I still prefer a single handed rod for salt water duty. 

AP

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2013, 10:33:40 AM »
As far as going to a straight spey setup...I just thought it would be too heavy of a rig for trout. I just thought a switch rod would be perfect for salmon and trout.

Unfortunately, it is nearly impossible to use just one fly rod for the standard opportunities we have here.  A 5wt single-handed rod for trout/humpies and a 8wt spey rod for salmon/steelhead is probably as barebones as you can get to cover all the bases.  If money gets in the way of achieving this, I'd suggest you ask around (even on the Internet) for good deals on used stuff.  Fly guys are notorious hoarders and there are A LOT of old, unused rods sitting in closets that people are willing to unload if you just ask.




Sheepdog

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2013, 04:07:05 PM »
I'll chime in on this one....I got a switch rod last year and it was the best decision I've made in a while.  I've been fishing one handers for years and it does get kinda tiring during the salmon season.  I'd thought about a two hander for a couple seasons and after looking into it, I found the choices kind of overwhelming....how long a rod and then which one and THEN which line.  I'm a cheap bstrd and didn't want to buy a rod and end up not liking it but MAKING it work cuz I'm too stubborn and dutch to buy a different one.  I tried teaching myself the casts from the different videos out there but I couldn't make it work. Anyhow, I decided to sign up with a guide for lessons...definitely the way to go...Ed Megill over at Confluence was great.  I learned the line and rod I'd been trying to teach myself with were not properly matched and wouldn't work together.  He brought out a couple different rods to try, watched my pathetic style, and recommended a rod or two.  I intended to go for a full spey because it looks cool in the movies but loved the Echo 10'11" 6wt switch.  We met a couple times and he let me borrow the set up to try for a while to practice with.  I won't lie....it was the most expensive rod set up I've purchased but it was well worth it in the long run.  Ed matched the line to the rod and basically took all the headache out of it.    I like the switch cuz I can cast one handed if I like or if there are obstacles around...do a double woopdeedoo spey cast...and then the rods short enough that I can land fish without too much trouble...plus it's short enough to twitch the fly during the swing or any of the other stuff I do to make the fish not want to take my fly :) Switch or full Spey...it's all up to you but get an introduction or lesson and I can't give enough kudo's to Ed at Confluence. Scott's a good guy too, he knows his stuff and definitely has helped me out with flies and tying...I just happened to connect with Ed first.  Bottom line, don't waste your time trying to figure it out yourself...get some help from someone who knows their stuff.....does this sound too much like a commercial  ?:)

jbooyah

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2013, 12:51:43 AM »
Thanks for the input. What you said is what had me wanting a switch rod but like I said earlier I'm gonna hit the fly shop and try em out.  ;D

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Re: Switch rods
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2013, 12:51:43 AM »

 

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